Blog

  1. Care Tips for Citrus Trees in Pots

    Care Tips for Citrus Trees in Pots

    Just getting started? Read our Selection Guide for the best Citrus varieties for container culture.

    Already ordered your new Improved Dwarf Meyer Lemons, Bearss Limes or Calamondin Oranges? Congrats!

    Let's get started early to prepare for the arrival of your new tree.

    Finding a Suitable Pot or Fabric Grow Bag

    Making good choices about containers doesn't have to be expensive. People are getting really creative in their Victory Garden designs. Go fancy if you can, or "cheap out" if you need to.

    Either

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  2. Grow Lemons in Pots: Victory Garden Selection Guide

    Top Varieties for Growing Citrus in Pots

    Join the Victory Garden movement! It seems like everyone is adding fruiting trees and plants to their landscape, no matter how large or small. After all, one of the best things in life to enjoy the taste, fragrance and health benefits of homegrown fruit.

    There is also something very satisfying about the feeling of being prepared. People all across the country are realizing how fulfilling it is to grow food for themselves, family and friends.

    Beyond sowing the seeds of a vegetable garden, why not add Citrus trees in your Victory Garden design? Growing your own lemons, limes, oranges and other Citrus varieties save you a lot of money over the long haul.

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  3. Will Tree Roots Damage My Water Pipes, Foundation, Sidewalks or Driveways?

    Tree roots

    Here at Nature Hills, we get asked a lot of questions about planting trees. People want to know if tree roots will grow into and damage pipes, water and sewer lines.  

    Sure, it’s true that some plants have aggressive roots and some trees are very surface-rooted. Certain soil conditions may cause a tree to adapt their typical style.  

    And of course, everyone's pipes are different. An old, cracked Orangeburg or clay pipe certainly tells a different story than new PVC pipe and steel pipes. 

    Tree Root Growth 101

    All roots are there to find food, oxygen, and water, and to anchor the plant in the soil

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  4. High-Density Planting and Successive Ripening Tips

    Summer pruning is key to high-density planting success

    Harvest season is the real payoff from planting fruit trees and plants. Here are some easy tips for home gardeners interested in increasing their yields.

    Imagine a continuous stream of super-fresh fruit for an entire season! The secret is planting your backyard orchard for successive ripening.

    Adding Variety to Your Edible Landscape

    You can buy specialty trees that have been multi-grafted. Growers graft several different varieties to a single rootstock.

    Who wouldn’t want to plant a single fruit tree and then have it continually provide fruit for the entire season?

    It’s a great concept and can be successful. However, please note that this does requires careful pruning to ensure that no one variety “takes over”.

    Perhaps an easier and more effective solution is to incl

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  5. Top 10 Landscaping Tips for Millennials (& Other Newbies)

    Top 10 Landscaping Tips

    We almost named this blog post “How Not to Kill Your First Landscape”, but at Nature Hills, we like to focus on the positive. Whether you are getting started with Houseplants, live in a cute little condo, or rent/own your first house; caring for plants makes life better. 

    Growing a successful garden is a rewarding experience. However, it can be tough to know where to start, especially if it’s your first time.

    Our 10 helpful tips for developing a successful landscape design will set you up for long-term success. You got this!

    1. Know Your Space

    It might sound strange, but the first thing you need to do ISN'T choose plants. Instead, the first step is to get to know your physical space.

    All plants have special requirements for light, air, and water. Take a loo

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  6. Gain Big Benefits with Biodiversity from Mixed Plantings

    Create a biodiverse planting with help from Nature Hills

    Biodiversity (n). the variety of life in the world or in a particular habitat or ecosystem.

    Most of us think of our gardens as peaceful places to spend time and quite literally “smell the flowers,” but what if our gardens brought us a little closer to nature?

    Biodiversity in the garden is a hot trend; the result of a crossover between gardening and ecology. Biodiverse gardens, also known as cottage gardens, wildlife gardens or mixed plantings, are all about bringing back a little more “nature” into our lives.

    Unlike traditional gardens that may have five or fewer species, these nature-based gardens boast a dozen or more species. Everything is all planted together in a way that mimics their natural habitat.

    As a result, the plants in these gardens are much more resistant to comm

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  7. Selection Guide Low Chill Fruit Trees for Zones 9 and 10

    Grow your own healthy fruit

    The demand for locally grown fruit is red hot these days. It seems like everyone wants to enjoy the incredible taste, health benefits and experience of growing their favorite varieties. After all, there is nothing so satisfying as eating a piece of homegrown fruit, still warm from the sun.

    Modern plant hybridizers have been inspired to create new varieties. Growers are likewise searching to revisit older varieties that might be more widely adaptable.

    Here is a rundown of some of the best varieties. But first, let’s talk about what “Low Chill Hours” is and what they mean for your garden.

    Chill Requirements Definition

    In simple terms, chill requirements are the approximant number of cold hours (below 40 degrees and above 32) that accumulate between the start of fall and late January. There are a numbe

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  8. Don’t Stress Your Plant With Bad Air Circulation

    Some plants need plenty of good air circulation for health. Fresh air will help prevent the growth of certain fungus, bacteria and molds. 

    Planting sites with poor air circulation can introduce disease issues and stress your plants. Stressed plants can attract insect problems, as well. Growing conditions make a big difference in the health of your plants.

    Never fear! Read on for #ProPlantTips on how to improve air circulation for plants from the Nature Hills horticulturist team.

    How To Site Your Plant Correctly

    Please, don’t slam your plants right up against the house, other structures, or next to other plants.

    Study the mature size when selecting your plants. Get out there and measure to determine the right number of plants for the area you are planting. 

    Install plants far enough apart to accommodate the size of the plant a

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  9. How To Use Accent Plants In A Landscape Plan

    Gorgeous Accent Plants from Nature Hills

    When it comes to curb and garden appeal, you can’t go wrong with an accent plant. These stand-alone or small grouping of plants are meant to draw the eye and provide a focal point in your garden. Adding accent plants to your yard is a great way to enhance visual appeal and make a lasting impression.

    What is an Accent Plant?

    As the name indicates, an accent plant is a shrub or tree with interesting characteristics that is placed to highlight your yard or garden. These are showstopper plants that offer some serious “wow” factor, from showy flowers, to bright fall foliage and unique form. 

    Benefits of Accent Plants

    There are many reasons to incorporate accent plants into your landscape. Consider this:

    • Visual impact. Accent plants help break up areas of repetitive textu
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  10. #ProPlantTips for Fall and Winter Planting

    Find out why fall and winter planting is so good for plants

    One of the best kept secrets of gardening is fall and winter planting. Take advantage of an “old farmer’s trick” and get your plants in the ground at the end of the season.

    Why does fall and winter planting work so well?

    The combination of warmer soil and colder air forces your plant to focus only on producing new roots in the fall and winter, which gives your plants a jump start on spring. Your new plant won’t make flower buds, flowers or seeds if it’s planted late in the season.

    Growing those critical roots helps your new plant get itself established in your landscape. And that is just what you want!

    Planting in fall t

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