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Nature Hill's Garden Blog

  • Growing Hibiscus

    SONY DSCGrowing hibiscus is not an arduous task. The occasional gardener can grow hardy hibiscus with good success by following a few simple suggestions. The first task for growing hibiscus is to select an appropriate site. The plant site should have adequate sunlight. The sunlight should be fully available for at least 6 to 8 hours a day.

    The second growing condition that needs to be addressed is the soil. Hibiscuses are quite adaptable to soil types. Providing a location with highly organic soil will greatly enhance growth and flower production. To increase organic matter, it may be advisable to mix sphagnum peat moss into the planting soil. After planting, the soil needs to be kept moist constantly for the first year or two. When they are fully established, they can accommodate some drought or excessive moisture. Continue reading

  • Pruning Hibiscus

    Pruning HibiscusPruning hibiscus is not normally needed for the hardy hibiscus. Actually, these plants are herbaceous perennials, meaning their tops die down to the ground each winter, but new shoots will come roaring back into lush growth when soils warm the following spring. Because the tops die down each year, pruning is generally limited to controlling plant size when it gets too large for its area.
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  • Pruning Forsythia

    Forsythia flower cutPruning forsythia provides great benefits to the forsythia plant. Many times forsythia is pruned for cut flowers. Pruning a forsythia plant also helps keep the plant to a bushier growth habit. Pruning forsythia also promoters better flowering.

    A frequently asked question is, ‘When is the best time for pruning forsythia?’ Pruning in December or January provides branches for forcing.  If some pruning is done when the plant is in bloom it again provides cut flowers for use in indoor arrangements. Additional pruning after flowering encourages better branching and the potential for more flowers in future years. Continue reading

  • Growing Ferns

    Fern in the winterGrowing ferns differs from growing other types of plants in many ways. First of all, many plants need partial to full sun to be able to survive in a garden.  Growing ferns in partial to full sun, on the other hand, will be extremely detrimental to the health of the plants. The natural habitat of many ferns is the rainforest, and they have become accustomed to being shaded and having lots of moisture. Continue reading

  • Dividing Ferns

    Multiple FernsMany time when growing ferns and other types of plants, they become too large for their pot or basket. When this happens, the plant must be placed into a larger pot or basket in order for the plant to continue growth.

    On many occasions, however, a larger holder may not be available or desired. On these occasions, it is possible to divide the plant into two or more smaller plants.  Dividing ferns is very similar to the act of dividing other perennials. First, the plant must be removed from the soil or pot.  This can sometimes be tricky, as the root structure inside the pot may be dense and unwieldy. Next, as much soil as possible must be removed to allow access to the root ball.
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  • Fern Life Cycle

    Fern SporesFerns, unlike some other plants, do not flower in order to propagate. Instead, they reproduce sexually from spores.  The life cycle of a fern is very different from the life cycle of many other plants.

    While many plants grow a mature adult form straight out of the seed, ferns have an intermediate stage, called a gametophyte, which then grows into a mature fern.  There are two distinct stages in the life cycle of ferns. Continue reading

  • What is a Fern?

    Cinnamon_fernA fern is a leafy, flowerless plant that grows in areas of high moisture. Ferns are vascular plants, in that they have a complex internal vein structure that supplies nutrients to the outer regions of the plant.

    Ferns are different from other vascular plants in that most vascular plants grow directly from seeds, while a fern grows from a spore, through an intermediate stage called a gametophyte.  A fern requires certain characteristics in its surroundings to grow. Moisture in the air and soil is a must. A fern is a fairly delicate plant, so wind protection is needed also.
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  • History Of The Dogwood Tree

    http://www.forestwander.comLong before we Americans got to this continent, the Eastern dogwood (Cornus florida) was here, blooming every spring at woodland edges all over the eastern half of the United States.  Descendants of those native dogwoods still put on a springtime show in yards, parks and even in our remaining forests.  There have been threats over the centuries--from farmers clearing land for crops in the early days to suburban developments and the anthracnose fungus more recently--but the dogwoods soldier on. Continue reading

  • Dogwood Pictures

    Dogwood Tree FlowersDogwood Berries

     

     

     

     

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  • Transplanting Daylilies

    Transplanting DayliliesOftentimes, a garden will become dense with plants that have grown into clumps and do not spread the way they used to. This is because many plants will not propagate great distances on their own.

    One way to thin out areas of the garden as well as spread plants further than they would naturally is through dividing and transplanting them. When dividing and transplanting daylilies, there are some basic steps to follow.
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9910 N. 48th Street, Suite 200 Omaha, NE 68152

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