Native Plants For Sale | NatureHills.com

  1. Are Elderberries Safe to Eat, Or Are They Poisonous?

    Are Elderberries Safe to Eat, Or Are They Poisonous?

    People are on the hunt for native plants that produce healthy berries. Today’s homeowner wants to take advantage of plants that provide edible – and ornamental – benefits.

    Elderberry is also commonly known as “Sambucus” and you can find extracts and a dried version in pill form at any health food store. Historically, cooked Elderberry Syrup has been used as chest remedies to treat colds and flu.

    Even though it’s touted for both immune support and to reduce the severity of colds, you may have heard that Elderberries are poisonous.

    Here’s why. The leaves, stems and roots of the plants as well as the seeds in the berries have chemicals which metabolize into cyanide. Eating the raw seeds can cause a build-up of cyanide in the body and make you ill.

    Many edible plants

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  2. Which Trees Grow the Fastest?

    Lovely River Birch graces a home with shade and beauty

    Today’s homeowners are looking for trees with speedy growth rates to provide privacy and shade as soon as possible. But the Nature Hills horticultural team thinks you should consider a few more qualities when making your decision….

    Need for Speed? Think Color, Too

    “So, which trees grow the fastest?”

    When you think of a fast growing tree, you will probably think of the usual cast of characters like cottonwood trees or willows that really grow fast in your area. However, you should know that there are other considerations to think about.

    Instead of focusing only on growth rate, let’s ask instead, “Which fast growing shade trees will give me addition

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  3. Care Tips for Small Ornamental Trees in Your Landscape

    Small ornamental tree by front door

    The first crop that sells out on the Nature Hills site is our super popular smaller ornamental trees. Some customers call them “Patio Trees.” No matter what you call them, we see the trend to use smaller trees in both front and backyard landscapes getting bigger.

    To keep up with the demand, we’ve really beefed up our numbers of smaller, more ornamental trees. After all, they fit so nicely into your landscape, and help you enjoy time spent outside on your patio.

    Short on Space? Choose a Small Tree

    With higher density housing in many areas, modern yards are not huge. Where space is limited, people want to choose plants with more ornamental attributes.

    We’ve talked before about plant trends for more color and more seasons of interest. Plant breeders have introduced selections of high

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  4. Flower Gardens Bring Butterflies and Beneficial Insects

    Plant Flowering Trees, Shrubs and Plants for Butterflies

    Want to know a secret? The key to attracting butterflies, beneficial insects and pollinators is to grow plants that flower.

    Now, you can certainly refine your approach to this, but planting flowering plants is the first step. Bees, birds, butterflies and beneficial insects love blooming plants as much as you do!

    These animals play an incredibly key role in the ecosystem. Declining populations from industrial agriculture and pesticides are wreaking havoc on our fruit, flower and food crops.

    At Nature Hills, we have expanded our plant palate to include many more natives and plants for your yard. You’ll be amazed at the many options to attract these important and beautiful creatures to your yard.

    Get Started Building a Butterfly Garden

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  5. Harvest Time for your Super Berries from the Aronia Plants

    Black Chokeberry plants are native to the upper Midwest and northeast states and into Canada.  There has been a lot of research and breeding going on with the Aronia plants commonly known as Black Chokeberry.  Maybe Chokeberry doesn’t sound so attractive, so some like to call them Black Appleberries. 

    See, the thing about these deep dark berries is that they help to eliminate inflammation in the body and the antioxidant levels are more than 340% higher than blueberries!  Holy cow!

    These deep dark fruits are so easy to grow on super hardy bushes that produce many pounds of fruit each year.  They beauty of Aronia berries is they all ripen at the same time so they can all be harvested now before they begin to shrivel.  They must be pulled from the bushes.  They look like Blueberries in size and similar in color. 

    A

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  6. Health Benefits of Aronia Berries

    Aronia is a hot new superfruit. Sounds better than chokeberry!

    Aronia plants are known as chokeberry plants. We know that name is not very appealing. On the contrary, Chokeberry plants offer multi-seasonal interest with flowers, fruit, fall color, and fruit that persists all winter long.Aronia plants make killer landscape plants, and are most desirable because they are wildly adaptable to sun or shade, and tolerate almost all kinds of soils, even those that don't drain well. Aronia plants have super glossy leaves all season long. In fall, they burst out into shades of red, purple,

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  7. A Pre-Planned Perennial Garden For Full Sun Areas

    With so many options to choose from when it comes to planning a perennial bed, it can be crazy to try to decide where to start. Enter this perfect perennial recipe! Each of these plants will look fantastic with each other, with different bloom times, flower colors, and foliage shapes. All of them will be fantastic in full sun in any soil type, but will do best in loamy or sandy soil. For best results, this recipe works best in zones 4 - 8, but some of the plants can extend beyond that range. 

     Origami Red & White Columbine

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  8. History Of The Dogwood Tree

    http://www.forestwander.com

    Long before we Americans got to this continent, the Eastern dogwood (Cornus florida) was here, blooming every spring at woodland edges all over the eastern half of the United States.  Descendants of those native dogwoods still put on a springtime show in yards, parks and even in our remaining forests.  There have been threats over the centuries--from farmers clearing land for crops in the early days to suburban developments and the anthracnose fungus more recently--but the dogwoods soldier on.

    When the average person sees a dogwood "flower", he or she is actually seeing four bracts or colored leaves, surrounding a center, which contains the ac

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