Tree Care

  1. Learn More About All Things Cedar

    Nature Hills grows many different kinds of Cedar trees, one that should work in your area.  Traditionally, wood from some Cedar trees is very fragrant and resists decay and it gets used for fence posts, shingles and siding for buildings.  It seems that all grandmas had a cedar chest and kept things in that chest that would be protected from bugs getting into it as well.

    Wide Selection of Cedar Tree Varieties For Your Garden

    Deodar Cedar is a large grower that has arching branches so very graceful in appearance and many times in warmer climates it is used for a living Christmas tree.  An elegant evergreen, great in natural groups for screening, or even a specimen as a focal point in your yard or perhaps a potted plant on your patio.  Beautiful fine textured silvery gray evergre

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  2. Learn More About Arborvitae, the Tree of Life

    Nature Hills grows two different species of Arborvitae:

    1. Thuja occidentalis selections
    2. Thuja plicata selections

    Why Arborvitae? 

    Arborvitae are super-fast growing, make the perfect screening plant, and have plenty of surface area to absorb sound.  You have no better way to eliminate ugly views, block some wind, catch some snow, and give you the perfect green backdrop to design around. 

    Most upright forms of Arborvitae can grow two feet or so each year.  There are some globe selections that are rounded and some that have yellow colored foliage.  Today we are focusing on the upright forms that are many times used for hedging or screening plants. 

    The fine textured foliage is born in a flat plane, but the plants are soft and dense, and they make beautiful hedges. 

    Expert Tip

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  3. Maple Tree Root System

    Maple Trees in the Garden

    The maple tree root system is one of the most important factors to consider before planting a maple tree in a home garden. Different types of maple trees have different types of root systems. Some are small and compact; others can be large and sparse. Some maple tree root systems are deep, while others are just below the surface.

    The silver maple tree root system is one of the most intrusive of all the maple tree root systems. The silver maple tree root system is large and has very strong roots. They will easily grow up and raise cement sidewalks and porches. Planted near a house, the si

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  4. Planting Maple Trees

    Planting Sugar Maple Trees

    Planting maple trees can be a very straightforward process. It is similar to the act of planting most other trees. There are some considerations, however, to understand before planting maple trees. First of all is the root system of maple trees. Some maple trees, like the Silver maple, have very intrusive root systems. They can grow large and often break or destroy sidewalks, or basement walls. They should be planted away from such areas. Gardeners or landscapers interested in planting maple trees should also consider the location in relation to other plants.

    Some maple trees, such as the

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  5. Dogwood Pictures

    Dogwood Tree Flowers Dogwood Berries
    http://www.forestwander.com White Dogwood Flower
    Red Dogwood Twigs Covered In I
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  6. History Of The Dogwood Tree

    http://www.forestwander.com

    Long before we Americans got to this continent, the Eastern dogwood (Cornus florida) was here, blooming every spring at woodland edges all over the eastern half of the United States.  Descendants of those native dogwoods still put on a springtime show in yards, parks and even in our remaining forests.  There have been threats over the centuries--from farmers clearing land for crops in the early days to suburban developments and the anthracnose fungus more recently--but the dogwoods soldier on.

    When the average person sees a dogwood "flower", he or she is actually seeing four bracts or colored leaves, surrounding a center, which contains the a

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  7. Planting Arborvitae

    Planting_Arborvitae

    Planting arborvitaes is easy, as they generally require no aftercare to thrive, aside from occasional pruning. Once a suitable site is selected, the hole should be dug large enough for the root system to spread out. The roots should be only a few inches underneath the surface of the soil, as they require air to grow properly.   Once in place, the plant should be watered.  Planting arborvitaes should be done in an area of moist, alkaline soil for best results. This is not required, however, as arborvitaes will grow in dry or acidic soil as well.

    They can be planted just about anywhere that has full to partial sun. Hardy to zones three to eight, arborvitaes

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  8. Pruning Arborvitae

    Pruned Arborvitae

    Pruning arborvitae trees is an important part of the maintenance process. Many of the species of arborvitae trees will not need any pruning, as they will maintain a natural shape that is pleasing to the eye.  In these cases, pruning arborvitae should only be done in order to limit the height that the plant will reach. In other cases, pruning will allow the gardener to change the shape of the plant into a hedge, or a more ornamental shape.

    The first step to pruning arborvitae is to understand when and why to prune. If a tree is mature, many of the branches may not be as lively as they once were.  This may be from lack of sunlight or proper nutrients. When this happens, pruning the plant down

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  9. Transplanting Arborvitae

    Arborvitae Cuttings

    Transplanting arborvitae is a fairly straightforward process. It is very similar to the act of transplanting most other plants. Transplanting arborvitae should always be done in the autumn months. The first step is to dig around the plant and fairly deep. The underground root structure of an arborvitae shrub or tree can sometimes get pretty large, and it is important not to damage any roots if possible.

    Once the plant is up, remove much of the soil from around the roots. This can be done using water or lightly shaking the roots.

    Once the soil has been removed, select a new location for the plant.  Ensure that the new

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  10. Arborvitae Growth Rate

    640px-Russian_Arborvitae_Microbiota_decussata_Stalks_3008px

    Arborvitae growth will appear in the early spring, and continue until well into autumn. The rate at which it grows will depend on the species that is in question. Globe arborvitae will grow at a pretty slow rate, while techny arborvitae can grow at a rate of four feet per year once the plant has matured. The arborvitae growth will appear mostly on branches and stems that had been cut back the previous year.

    Pruning an arborvitae plant in the winter will help to encourage more arborvitae growth in the comin

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