Planting Trees & Bushes

  1. Ash Trees in the Urban Landscape


    Common Ash Tree Common Ash Tree

    Why is it that Ash trees became so popular to plant anyway? Green, Black and White Ash are native over a large portion of the US and Canada. Many nurseries have some incredible selections from the native species that are seedless, have great fall color, and beautiful upright and rounded forms. Municipalities, homeowners, and Landscape Architects began noticing the beautiful seedless selections that were coming on the market. They began being used on most all the projects not only because of their varied forms and fall color, but because of their adaptability of different soil types, and hardiness. If you have ever seen an Autumn Purple Ash in fall color, you know just how unbelievably and intensely gorgeous they can

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  2. The Complete Guide For Taking Care of Boston Ivy

    Boston Ivy On Brick Wall

    Boston Ivy Care

    Many people use boston ivy plants to cover walls, fences, pergolas and more. Being a very low maintenance plant, it is easy to care for but some upkeep is still needed for a beautiful looking vine.

    Planting Boston Ivy

    When choosing a location it is best to find an area that is sunny and has good soil. These conditions will help get better results with the plant growing faster and healthier. Boston ivy should be planted 18 to 24 inches apart. Plant them closer together if you want faster coverage on a wall or trellis. Boston Ivy should be planted 12 inch

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  3. Wisteria Care

    You've purchased a Blue Chinese Wisteria Tree, or an Amethyst Falls Wisteria Vine, and are now looking into how to maximize the blooms of this plant. Follow this simple guide to best care for your wisteria plant.

    Selecting a Location

    For best results, your wisteria should be planted in well-drained soil, and should receive a mi

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  4. Top 5 Shrubs for a Windbreak

    Windbreak ShrubsAlong with planting evergreens and deciduous trees, shrubs are an essential part of windbreak design. Because they provide another layer of protection from the harsh winter winds, consider using these shrubs in your windbreak to maximize the protection available to you in every season.  

    ElderberryElderberry - Sambucus spp.
    Prized for it's fragrant flowers and delicious fruits, elder

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  5. Top 5 Deciduous Trees for Windbreaks

    Tree Windbreak

    It may seem counter-intuitive to plant deciduous trees in your windbreak, given that they have no leaves in the winter when they come into the most use. However, using deciduous trees in you windbreak provides you with shade in the summer and creates a more diverse planting. Having increased diversity helps prevent the total devastation of your windbreak should one species be impacted by disease or other natural causes, along with providing habitat for wildlife.

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  6. 5 of the Biggest Trees You Can Plant at Home

    "The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now." - Chinese Proverb Every tree is different.  Some are little more than bushes at their tallest, while others are meant to grow gigantic and form canopies in the sky.  If you're looking for a tree that will tower over your yard for decades to come, check out these varieties:

    Northern Red Oak 2

    5. Northern Red Oak: avg. 90 ft, exceptional specimens taller than 140 ft

    Sometimes called the champion oak, the northern red oak

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  7. Top 5 Winter Interest Plants

    Winter is the ever-returning friend and foe of gardeners.  You may rue the arrival of Jack Frost every year, driving you inside and sapping all the color from your garden.  But did you know that there are a number of plants that can keep your garden pretty all through the cold season? Looking to liven up your white-washed winter landscape?  Dust the dreariness with one of these winter interest plants:  

    dogarctic1

    #5 

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  8. The Top 6 Best Trees For Wildlife

    6 Terrific Trees for Wildlife  

    Deer in the forest
    1. Quaking Aspen

    2. American Holly

    3. Eastern Red Cedar

    4. Hackberry

    5. Shumard Oak

    6. American Persimmon
    If you’re anything like me, watching a graceful deer stroll across my yard brings a special sense of awe and tranquility to my home. There’s nothing quite like the feeling of welcoming some of nature’s most spectacular creatures to share a part of my life, and having the right trees can be essential to issuing that invitation directly to them.
    One of my favorite choices for wildlife-friendly trees is the Quaking Aspen. Not only is this tree lovely (with its white bark and gently dancing leaves), but it’s also a versatile gift for wildlife. Deer, Elk and Moose enjoy its shade, and love to nibble its leaves and twigs for the nutritional boost it gives them throughout the year. Many animals venture into the Aspen’s stately presence to enjoy its protective shade, and Ruffed Grouse particularly enjoy it for the nesting opportunities it presents.
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  9. Transplanting and Planting Peonies

    Almost Blooming Peony Flower

    Peony plants are beginning to show up more in gardens all around the world. This is due to more gardeners receiving the word about how beautiful these plants can be when placed in the proper setting. Peony plants are also somewhat easier to grow than other plants, due to their nature to be able to sustain themselves without much human interference. Peony plants work in a variety of setting in the garden. They make excellent focus points, with their dense green foliage and large bold blooms. The lower growing peony plants, such as the fernleaf peony, also make excellent border plants and accents. The fernleaf peony plant is also very useful to plant in front of other flowers in order to hide foliage that may fall off earlier

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  10. Planting Apple Trees

    Planting a new apple tree

    Planting apple trees in a home garden will allow for delicious fruit that everybody can enjoy. Planting apple trees does not differ much from planting other types of trees, but there are some special things to consider when planting these fruit trees. The location should have soil that is well drained, since standing water will easily kill the trees. The location should also have good air drainage, keeping low-lying cold air in the spring away from the tree. Apple trees should be planted in November, if possible. They can also be planted up to the end of march. The location used for planting apple trees should also provide for full sun access. If planting apple trees in a lawn, the grass should be removed from the planting area in

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