Hydrangea Care

  1. You Can Change the Color of Some Hydrangeas

    There are many kinds of Hydrangeas available today. Maybe the plant breeders went a little crazy introducing new selections recently. The good news is there are a lot of Hydrangeas with new color options, smaller plants, and more flower power!

    Nature Hills offers many options with some of the newest and the best.

    There is one group of Hydrangeas with pink or red flowers that can be changed to blue or purple flowers by altering the soil pH. This group is called Bigleaf Hydrangeas (Hydrangea macrophylla) and the flower color can be changed by growing the plants in a lower soil pH.

    There was a breakthrough with this species of Hydrangea that opened the door to growing them in colder regions. Then the plant breeders went to town introducing many new varieties with many new shades of reds, pinks

    Read more »
  2. How to Prune Hydrangeas

    It is important to know what kind of Hydrangea you have before you do any pruning. The reason it is important to know so that you are not cutting off any flower buds, really the reason for growing Hydrangeas!

    It is probably easiest to break down the types of Hydrangeas and suggest pruning for each of the different types. Each group of Hydrangea includes some of the selections available from Nature Hills. 

    Hardy, Panicle type Hydrangeas (Hydrangea paniculata selections)

    These are woody type, hardy Hydrangeas that love the sun and are very forgiving needing little care.  You can’t change the color of this group to blue, but they offer quite the show opening white, and age to pink or red before turning brown in fall and winter.

    Pruning for Hydrangea paniculata shrub form and tree form should be done in early spring b

    Read more »
  3. Pruning Woody Hydrangea Paniculata Type Shrubs

    Now is the time to prune your woody, sun-loving panicle type Hydrangeas (like Limelight, Quickfire, Diamond Rouge Little Lamb, Pinky Winky, Fire Light, Little Lime, Strawberry Sundae, Vanilla Strawberry and any other species in this group).

    The best rule of thumb is to cut back these woody plants by reducing about 1/3 of the length of last year’s growth, removing the brown flower heads that remain on the plant. 

    Leave the overall shape som

    Read more »
  4. Unraveling Hydrangeas Pt. II: Woody Types

    Pinky Winky

    Let’s look at the three woody types of Hydrangeas, how to best care for them, and what to expect from each.

    Hydrangea paniculata types are the sun loving plants that have woody stems. This group currently up for sale from Nature Hills includes: Fire Light, Quick Fire, Little Lamb, Phantom, Vanilla Strawberry, Pinky Winky, Limelight, Strawberry Sundae, Little Quick Fire, Bobo, Little Lime, Silver Dollar, and Zinfin Doll.

    This group all goes through the same transformation when it comes to the flower colors. Hydrangea paniculata types cannot have their flower changed from pink to blue by growing in acidic soils. No matter what the soils are, they start out with green leaves, flower

    Read more »
  5. Unraveling Hydrangeas Pt. I: Planting, Pruning, and Care

    Grateful Red HydrangeaLet’s look at a couple different kinds of Hydrangeas, how to best care for them, and what to expect from each.

    Hydrangea macrophylla types are a part sun loving group that appreciates some relief from the hot afternoon sun especially in warmer climates. The Hydrangea frenzy started with this group and has grown to include many selections too. This group that Nature Hills currently have up for sale include: Endless summer, Big Daddy, Twist and Shout, Blushing Bride, Let’s Dance Moonlight, Cityline Rio, Grateful Red,

    Read more »
  6. The 4 Main Types Of Hydrangeas

    Hydrangeas! Everybody loves them. They are at home in almost any garden, and gardeners know it. Their lush greenery and long-­lived flowers make them a favorite among landscapers and amateur gardeners alike. Hydrangeas bloom year after year, stay in bloom from early spring to late autumn, and some of them have the ability to change floral color like magic. Because hydrangeas are such a favorite, they tend to be a big seller. Retailers offer a range of different types of hydrangeas. It's important to know what you are getting, because there's a lot of variety. Some are different species, some are merely different cultivars. Cultivars are different ­looking plants of the same species (think: dog breeds.) Gets a little confusi

    Read more »
  7. Pruning Hydrangeas

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Pruning hydrangeas is easy to do, and will help in providing more blooms for the following growing season. Hydrangea pruning varies slightly from species to species, depending on when and where the plant will bloom. After the blooms have finished their season, removing them will allow the plant to focus its energy on storing food for the coming winter. When the winter comes, it is important to not cut off the brown stems. It is on these stems that the plant will bloom the following year. Pruning hydrangeas in the winter can entail topping off the plants in order to shape them. There should only be an inch or so taken off smaller plants and three to five inches taken off larger plants. The cut should be done just above a joint.

    Read more »
  8. Planting Hydrangeas

    Hydrangeas_flowers

    Planting hydrangea can be a fun and rewarding experience. Once the beautifully bright bloom has emerged, all the work involved in planting hydrangea will pay off. The first step to planting hydrangea is choosing the proper location for best results. The site chosen must have a good deal of direct sunlight daily, but some shade is also preferred. The soil must be dry to moist and have good drainage to prevent root rot. Knowing the pH level of the soil will help to predict the color of the blooms.

    The second step to planting hydrangea is the actual planting. The state the flower was obtained in determines when the planting should take place. Hydrangeas that were container grown should be planted in the spring or fall months. Bare root hydrangea shou

    Read more »