Groundcover, Vine and Fern Care

  1. Terrariums For Plants & How To Build One!

    What is a Terrarium?

    4 Types of Terrarium Plants

    5 Step Planting Guide To Assemble A Terrarium

    Where You Can Get Your Own Terrarium

    What Is a Terrarium?

    By definition, a terrarium is a sealed transparent globe or similar container in which plants are grown. They are often made of glass or plastic and wood.

    While some terrariums can house small animals, the majority of them house beautiful and vivacious plants. Terrariums are a great tool and decorative piece that gives your plants an enclosed and controlled

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  2. Sedum: Your Yard’s Greatest Companion

    Angelina Sedum Groundcover Going Down Stairs

    What is Sedum?

    Not sure what sedum is? We can almost guarantee you’ve seen it in your lifetime!

    Sedum is quite simple to imagine. Picture a

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  3. Best Ferns For Your Home

    Boston Fern In Living Room

    Best Fern For Your Zone InfographicEveryone longs for a plant that's easy to care for, elegant, and versatile in landscaping. You’ll be relieved to know that this picture-perfect plant is usually sitting right before your eyes.

    Ferns will be your new best friend with their capability to add the perfect dash of elegance to your garden, patio, or indoor living area.

    If you take a nature walk, I’m sure you’ll find these plants everywhere. If you’re looking for one, this is your sign to add those natural beauties to your backyard!

    Whether that be in the mix with your shrubs and roses, in containers near your favorite relaxation spot on your porch, or hanging inside your house. These plants are calling your name!

    There are a variety of different colors, shapes, and sizes to pick from and we’re here to fill you in on all their unique details that will have you wanting to order more than just one of these quintessential plants.

    Fill the upcoming years wit

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  4. The Complete Guide For Taking Care of Boston Ivy

    Boston Ivy Care

    Many people use boston ivy plants to cover walls, fences, pergolas and more. Being a very low maintenance plant, it is easy to care for but some upkeep is still needed for a beautiful looking vine.

    Boston Ivy

    Plant Highlights:
    • USDA Zone 4-8
    • Fast-growing
    • Grows in any Sun/Shade Condition
     
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  5. Wisteria Care

    nymans gardens You've purchased a Blue Chinese Wisteria Tree, or an Amethyst Falls Wisteria Vine, and are now looking into how to maximize the blooms of this plant. Follow this simple guide to best care for your wisteria plant.

    Selecting a Location

    For best results, your wisteria should be planted in well-drained soil, and should receive a minimum of six hours of full sun. Be sure to have sufficient space for the full canopy to develop - 15 feet minimum is ideal. You may need to provide a stake for the tree for the first few years until the trunk can support the weight of the canopy. The vine requires

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  6. Clematis Vine Varieties That are Perfect for Shady Areas

     

    Clematis vines are great additions to the landscape as a flowering vine, but there are so many different varieties to choose! No need to fret if you have a shady area; some varieties will flourish in shade. Whether you're trying to grow the vine up a trellis or around your mailbox, here are six clematis vines to plant in that shady location.

     

     

    Clematis Avant Garde - Clematis 'Evipo033' shop clematis avant garde

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  7. Planting Tips for Honeysuckle Vine

    Honeysuckle Bush

    Planting honeysuckle is easy, as they generally require no aftercare to thrive, aside from occasional pruning. Once a suitable site is selected, the hole should be dug large enough for the root system to spread out. The roots should be only a few inches underneath the surface of the soil, as they require air to grow properly. Once in place, the plant should be watered.

    Plant these bushes in an area of moist, alkaline soil for best results. This is not required, however, as varieties of honeysuckle will grow in dry or acidic soil as well. They can be planted just about anywhere that has full sun, although some will survive in areas of partial shade. The hardiness of honeysuckle will depend on the species or cultivar. When planting honeysuckle vines, there should be a trellis or fence to climb, and they climb by twining. This means that they will not be able to climb a wall that does not have anything to twine around.

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  8. Growing Honeysuckle Vine is Easy and Fun

    Red Honeysuckle Flower

    Growing honeysuckle is a fun and easy activity for any gardener. Honeysuckle is relatively easy to care for, if the proper conditions are given. Most honeysuckle plants require full sun, yet some will tolerate partial shade. Honeysuckle plants also need a good amount of moisture in the soil to thrive, but standing water may cause rot. The best thing to do when growing honeysuckle is to mulch heavily near the base of the plant. This will allow the soil to maintain moisture and also provide shade for the root system.

    Growing should be done in a location with a good amount of soil drainage. While they are drought tolerant, growing honeysuckle plants do need a good deal of moisture in order to grow properly. They should be watered regularly to ensure that the soil is moist. Growing honeysuckle plants can be done in just about every region of the world, as there are some that grow in dry, arid areas, and others that will grow in Arctic Russia.

    Another important aspect of growing honeysuckle is how and when to prune. Pruning honeysuckle differently will result in different bloom times and quantities. Honeysuckle should all be pruned in late February to March, removing any dead or weak stems, as the plants will generally only flower on new growth. Care throughout the growing season will then differ depending on how and when the particular honeysuckle blooms, and how long the bloom period lasts.

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  9. Growing Ferns

    Fern in the winter

    Growing ferns differs from growing other types of plants in many ways. First of all, many plants need partial to full sun to be able to survive in a garden.  Growing ferns in partial to full sun, on the other hand, will be extremely detrimental to the health of the plants. The natural habitat of many ferns is the rainforest, and they have become accustomed to being shaded and having lots of moisture.

    Growing ferns differs from other plants in the amount of moisture needed. Most plants will get along fine when watered a couple times a week at most.  Ferns, on the other hand, require constant moisture in both the soil and the air in order to grow properly. Misting the leaves of a fern plant is the best way to mimic the extremely humid atmosphere that the plants are generally local to.

    Fern i

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  10. Dividing Ferns Made Easy

    Multiple Ferns

    Many time when growing ferns and other types of plants, they become too large for their pot or basket. When this happens, the plant must be placed into a larger pot or basket in order for the plant to continue growth. On many occasions, however, a larger holder may not be available or desired. On these occasions, it is possible to divide the plant into two or more smaller plants.  Dividing ferns is very similar to the act of dividing other perennials. First, the plant must be removed from the soil or pot.  This can sometimes be tricky, as the root structure inside the pot may be dense and unwieldy. Next, as much soil as possible must be removed to allow access to the root ball.

    Using a sharp, long bladed knife to cut the root ball into equal pieces, depending on the number of plants desired. Each part should then be replanted into a separate container. Dividing ferns is unlike dividing other perennials in that ferns can take quite a bit of abuse when dividing.  The root ball is

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