Monthly Archives: November 2017

  1. Brighten Winter With Bloom Pads

    Bloom Pads from Nature Hills will make spring arrive early inside your home.  Brighten the bleak winter days with bursts of colorful flowers and super fragrance!

    Bloom Pads are spring flowering bulbs that are placed between two pieces of biodegradable paper.

    Here is how to best handle them:

    Your Bloom Pads were just delivered!  Simply put the bulbs in the vegetable drawer of your fridge.  Keep them in the pads they came in, and don’t store them with apples or fruit.  Chill them in the fridge for 12-16 weeks.  Bring them out of the fridge, planting the entire pad just under the soil surface.  Be

    Read more »
  2. Indoor Winter Citrus Care

    This is the time of the year when all citrus grown in cold climates is brought indoors for winter protection. There are a few critical considerations that will allow your citrus plant to adapt to being indoors and stay healthy until it is put back outside in the spring.

    The optimal place to over winter a citrus is in a greenhouse that is climate controlled. This is rarely available to the average homeowner. The process of bringing plants indoors should begin about 3 weeks before expected night-time temperatures reach 35 degrees or less. Citrus plants should be brought to a protected location that is well lit but not necessarily full sun. A location up against the house is ideal. A covered patio works well or just a wall that has good radiant heat coming from the house. The idea is to get the pl

    Read more »
  3. Bare Root Plants: SOAK ROOTS – PLANT – SOAK SOIL = SUCCESS

    Bare root still good to ship until mid-June.

    Bare root plants are dormant and are shipped without any soil on the roots and no leaves on the stems. The roots are wrapped in a medium to keep them moist during shipping however. The plants will start to grow once they are planted into warm soil and catch up to the plants in your landscape before you know it. 

    Bare root plants are kept dormant in our coolers so the plants still think it is winter until they are taken out and planted. Look at a cherry tree recently planted and notice the new growth coming.  

    Read more »
  4. The Cottonless Cottonwood

    What are all those fussy things floating around in the air?  They are plugging up the screens in our house.  They are plugging up your air filters. 

    The Dandelion plants are kind of done showing their fussy seed heads so it can’t be those.

    In most cases, you are seeing the seeds from Cottonwood trees.  They are those large, stately trees that you most commonly seen in the western states.

    Nature Hills sells two different kinds of Cottonwood trees that are seedless and do not produce any of the messy, fuzzy seeds that you see at this time of the year: the Siouxland Cottonwood and the Hybrid Poplar.

    Why plant a Cottonless Cottonwood tree?  They are wildl

    Read more »
  5. Deer Damage

    Deer browsing on only the green foliage of the Arborvitae is very common in areas where there is a lot of deer pressure.  Many times, customers are confused about the damage being a disease or other problem other than deer eating the foliage off the bottoms where they can reach it. 

    Get to know what plants are magnets for the deer in your area.  Ask your local ag extension office if they have a list of plants that deer prefer in your area.

    Keep in mind that deer may prefer different plants in different areas.  The other factor to keep in mind is that if deer do get hungry, they may eat most any plants

    The other thing to know is that any time you do introduce new plants into an area, the very first day deer may sam

    Read more »
  6. Check Your Roses Please

    You overwintered your roses.  You cut back your roses this spring before they started to grow.  The new growth is pushing out, and the foliage looks great. 

    Bam…. that is just the time that bugs start to eat that clean, beautiful foliage.  Get out and check your rose bushes to see if there are any holes in the leaves, any bugs chewing or crawling on the tops or the undersides of the leaves.  If you are in an area that has Japanese Beetles, it is probably too early yet, but be on the lookout for them too.  Aphids, chafers, beetles and anything else… be on the lookout.     

    How to treat the bugs on your roses?  Choose the weapon that works for you.  Maybe you can physically just remove the bugs with your fingers?  Insecticidal soap can work and needs to be re-applied as rain washes it off.  Other insectic

    Read more »
  7. Mockorange Overhaul Due?

    Classic Mockorange plants of the past had kind of dull and not so attractive foliage and little fall color.  The plants were large and leggy and not so very attractive in the landscape as they got just too large. 

    Why Mockorange?  The flowers are wildly intoxicating and smell like sweet orange blossoms.  The other reason people planted Mockorange is because the elegant white flowers come at a time when there are not a lot of other shrubs blooming.  They typically start blooming in June after all the spring lilacs, Quince or Forsythia have finished. 

    Maybe you still have one of the old fashioned Mockorange shrubs in your yard now.  As soon as the flowers are done blooming, you can severely prune them as soon as the flowers are done blooming.   You can even cut all the stems down to the ground and new growth comes

    Read more »
  8. Peony Care After Flowering

    Peonies are amazing perennials.  Interesting how you even see them growing on abandoned farmsteads without any attention.  Simple care of full sun and well drained soils is all you need.

    Once the plants are done blooming, it is well worth your while to deadhead the old flower heads.  You do not want the plants to produce seed so removing the spent blooms it does not allow the plants to waste its food making seed, but storing food instead.  

    The other thing deadheading does is prevent fungal disease from affecting the plants. 

    Lastly, removing the old flower heads really cleans up the plants appearance and make them a nice green plant in the perennial or shrub border for the balance of the season. 

    Keep your Peony plants looking good, continue making food, and prevent disease simply by cutting of

    Read more »
  9. Pick your color…

    Annuals are a terrific way to put some color in your landscape.  You don’t have to go crazy overboard to really punch up the front of your home. 

    Pick plants that work. Select plants that don’t need a lot of fussing with deadheading or have problems with disease or insects.  Annuals planted in the ground will need less watering than the ones in containers as the season progresses.  But in all cases, be consistent with food and water for the best show.

    Then, pick your color palate.  What color is going to show up nicely against the color of your home?  Is your home dark brick, earth tones, or white?  Will your plants be in sun or shade?

    White and green can be very elegant.  White and blue are a classic combo.  How about white blue and yellow together?  Red and yellow together is very showy and used a lot.  

    Read more »
  10. Pruning Pine Trees

    You would think you might need a pruning shears to prune your pine trees…but not the case at all.

    When the new growth elongates like it does at this time of the year on Pine Trees, it looks like “candles” stuck on the tips of each branch.  Usually there is one center longer candle in the center surrounded with several shorter candles.

    The best time to prune all pine trees is when the new candle growth expands and before any needles have started to from on those candles – typically 6” or so.  That new growth is tender and very easily shortened up by breaking that new growth back by about half way with your fingers leaving the longer candle the longest on the tip of each branch, including the very top of the tree.

    Do not

    Read more »
Page