Monthly Archives: July 2015

  1. Growing Honeysuckle Vine is Easy and Fun

    Red Honeysuckle Flower

    Growing honeysuckle is a fun and easy activity for any gardener. Honeysuckle is relatively easy to care for, if the proper conditions are given. Most honeysuckle plants require full sun, yet some will tolerate partial shade. Honeysuckle plants also need a good amount of moisture in the soil to thrive, but standing water may cause rot. The best thing to do when growing honeysuckle is to mulch heavily near the base of the plant. This will allow the soil to maintain moisture and also provide shade for the root system.

    Growing should be done in a location with a good amount of soil drainage. While they are drought tolerant,

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  2. Planting Tips for Honeysuckle Vine

    Honeysuckle Bush

    Planting honeysuckle is easy, as they generally require no aftercare to thrive, aside from occasional pruning. Once a suitable site is selected, the hole should be dug large enough for the root system to spread out. The roots should be only a few inches underneath the surface of the soil, as they require air to grow properly. Once in place, the plant should be watered.

    Plant these bushes in an area of moist, alkaline soil for best results. This is not required, however, as varieties of honeysuckle will grow in dry or acidic soil as well. They can be planted just about anywhere that has full sun, although some will survive in areas of partial shade. The hardiness of honeysuckle will depend on the species or cultivar. When planting honeysuckle

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  3. How Much Do You Really Know About Ferns?

    Cinnamon_fern

    What is a Fern Anyway? A fern is a leafy, flowerless plant that grows in areas of high moisture. Ferns are vascular plants, in that they have a complex internal vein structure that supplies nutrients to the outer regions of the plant. Ferns are different from other vascular plants in that most vascular plants grow directly from seeds, while a fern grows from a spore, through an intermediate stage called a gametophyte.  A fern requires certain characteristics in its surroundings to grow. Moisture in the air and soil is a must. A fern is a fairly delicate plant, so wind protection is needed also.

    A fern will require some direct sunlight, but not too much. Ferns also prefer climates that are more or less constant. A fern will usually not live through a

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  4. The Life Cycle of Ferns

    Fern Spores

    Ferns, unlike some other plants, do not flower in order to propagate. Instead, they reproduce sexually from spores.  The life cycle of a fern is very different from the life cycle of many other plants. While many plants grow a mature adult form straight out of the seed, ferns have an intermediate stage, called a gametophyte, which then grows into a mature fern.  There are two distinct stages in the life cycle of ferns.

    The first stage is that of the gametophyte.  Spores are produced on the underside of mature plants. These will germinate and grow into small, heart-shaped plants called gametophytes.  The gametophytes produce both sperm and egg cells, and will fertilize itself, or others. Once the fertilization occurs, the adult fern will begin growing.

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  5. Dividing Ferns Made Easy

    Multiple Ferns

    Many time when growing ferns and other types of plants, they become too large for their pot or basket. When this happens, the plant must be placed into a larger pot or basket in order for the plant to continue growth. On many occasions, however, a larger holder may not be available or desired. On these occasions, it is possible to divide the plant into two or more smaller plants.  Dividing ferns is very similar to the act of dividing other perennials. First, the plant must be removed from the soil or pot.  This can sometimes be tricky, as the root structure inside the pot may be dense and unwieldy. Next, as much soil as possible must be removed to allow access to the root ball.

    Using a sharp, long bladed knife to cut the root ball into e

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  6. Growing Ferns

    Fern in the winter

    Growing ferns differs from growing other types of plants in many ways. First of all, many plants need partial to full sun to be able to survive in a garden.  Growing ferns in partial to full sun, on the other hand, will be extremely detrimental to the health of the plants. The natural habitat of many ferns is the rainforest, and they have become accustomed to being shaded and having lots of moisture.

    Growing ferns differs from other plants in the amount of moisture needed. Most plants will get along fine when watered a couple times a week at most.  Ferns, on the other hand, require constant moisture in both the soil and the air in order to grow properly. Misting the leaves of a fern plant is the best way to mimic the extremely humid atmosphere that t

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  7. Pruning Forsythia

    Forsythia flower cut

    Pruning forsythia provides great benefits to the forsythia plant. Many times forsythia is pruned for cut flowers. Pruning a forsythia plant also helps keep the plant to a bushier growth habit. Pruning forsythia also promoters better flowering. A frequently asked question is, "When is the best time for pruning forsythia?" Pruning in December or January provides branches for forcing.  If some pruning is done when the plant is in bloom it again provides cut flowers for use in indoor arrangements. Additional pruning after flowering encourages better branching and the potential for more flowers in future years.

    Pruning forsythia after flowering is the most widely used method. Cut out about one-third of the old woody growth.  This encourages n

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  8. Pruning Hibiscus

    Pruning Hibiscus

    Pruning hibiscus is not normally needed for the hardy hibiscus. Actually, these plants are herbaceous perennials, meaning their tops die down to the ground each winter, but new shoots will come roaring back into lush growth when soils warm the following spring. Because the tops die down each year, pruning is generally limited to controlling plant size when it gets too large for its area.

    Pruning the dead material back in the fall is recommended. Prune the dead material back to about 8 to 12 inches. Then, apply a thick layer of mulch over the plant roots, 8 to 12 inches, to keep plant roots from freezing.

    In the spring, remove the mulch and prune the remaining dead plant material to ground level. The tropical hibiscus can be pruned in

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  9. Growing Hibiscus

    SONY DSC

    Growing hibiscus is not an arduous task. The occasional gardener can grow hardy hibiscus with good success by following a few simple suggestions. The first task for growing hibiscus is to select an appropriate site. The plant site should have adequate sunlight. The sunlight should be fully available for at least 6 to 8 hours a day. The second growing condition that needs to be addressed is the soil. Hibiscuses are quite adaptable to soil types. Providing a location with highly organic soil will greatly enhance growth and flower production. To increase organic matter, it may be advisable to mix sphagnum peat moss into the planting soil. After planting, the soil needs to be kept moist constantly for the first year or two. When they are fully established,

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  10. Dogwood Pictures

    Dogwood Tree Flowers Dogwood Berries
    http://www.forestwander.com White Dogwood Flower
    Red Dogwood Twigs Covered In Ice
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