Hydrangea Care

  1. The 4 Main Types Of Hydrangeas

    Hydrangeas! Everybody loves them. They are at home in almost any garden, and gardeners know it. Their lush greenery and long-­lived flowers make them a favorite among landscapers and amateur gardeners alike. Hydrangeas bloom year after year, stay in bloom from early spring to late autumn, and some of them have the ability to change floral color like magic. Because hydrangeas are such a favorite, they tend to be a big seller. Retailers offer a range of different types of hydrangeas. It’s important to know what you are getting, because there’s a lot of variety. Some are different species, some are merely different cultivars. Cultivars are different ­looking plants of the same species (think: dog breeds.) Gets a little confusing, right? Well, here’s a quick guide to the most common types of hydrangeas you can buy for your garden. Hydrangea MacrophyllaHydrangea macrophylla Macrophylla is by far the most widely distributed kind of hydrangea, with many cultivars available. It has triangular leaves and bursts of floral color arranged in either  “mopheads,” which are groups of flowers shaped like pom­poms, or “lacecap hydrangeas,” which are flat-topped groups of flowers.
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  2. Planting Hydrangeas

    Hydrangeas_flowersPlanting hydrangea can be a fun and rewarding experience. Once the beautifully bright bloom has emerged, all the work involved in planting hydrangea will pay off. The first step to planting hydrangea is choosing the proper location for best results. The site chosen must have a good deal of direct sunlight daily, but some shade is also preferred. The soil must be dry to moist and have good drainage to prevent root rot. Knowing the pH level of the soil will help to predict the color of the blooms.
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  3. Pruning Hydrangeas

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPruning hydrangeas is easy to do, and will help in providing more blooms for the following growing season. Hydrangea pruning varies slightly from species to species, depending on when and where the plant will bloom. After the blooms have finished their season, removing them will allow the plant to focus its energy on storing food for the coming winter. When the winter comes, it is important to not cut off the brown stems. It is on these stems that the plant will bloom the following year. Pruning hydrangeas in the winter can entail topping off the plants in order to shape them. There should only be an inch or so taken off smaller plants and three to five inches taken off larger plants. The cut should be done just above a joint.
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