Monthly Archives: November 2015

  1. The 4 Main Types Of Hydrangeas

    Hydrangeas! Everybody loves them. They are at home in almost any garden, and gardeners know it. Their lush greenery and long-­lived flowers make them a favorite among landscapers and amateur gardeners alike. Hydrangeas bloom year after year, stay in bloom from early spring to late autumn, and some of them have the ability to change floral color like magic. Because hydrangeas are such a favorite, they tend to be a big seller. Retailers offer a range of different types of hydrangeas. It’s important to know what you are getting, because there’s a lot of variety. Some are different species, some are merely different cultivars. Cultivars are different ­looking plants of the same species (think: dog breeds.) Gets a little confusing, right? Well, here’s a quick guide to the most common types of hydrangeas you can buy for your garden. Hydrangea MacrophyllaHydrangea macrophylla Macrophylla is by far the most widely distributed kind of hydrangea, with many cultivars available. It has triangular leaves and bursts of floral color arranged in either  “mopheads,” which are groups of flowers shaped like pom­poms, or “lacecap hydrangeas,” which are flat-topped groups of flowers.
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  2. The Top 6 Best Trees For Wildlife

    6 Terrific Trees for Wildlife  

    Deer in the forest
    1. Quaking Aspen

    2. American Holly

    3. Eastern Red Cedar

    4. Hackberry

    5. Shumard Oak

    6. American Persimmon
    If you’re anything like me, watching a graceful deer stroll across my yard brings a special sense of awe and tranquility to my home. There’s nothing quite like the feeling of welcoming some of nature’s most spectacular creatures to share a part of my life, and having the right trees can be essential to issuing that invitation directly to them.
    One of my favorite choices for wildlife-friendly trees is the Quaking Aspen. Not only is this tree lovely (with its white bark and gently dancing leaves), but it’s also a versatile gift for wildlife. Deer, Elk and Moose enjoy its shade, and love to nibble its leaves and twigs for the nutritional boost it gives them throughout the year. Many animals venture into the Aspen’s stately presence to enjoy its protective shade, and Ruffed Grouse particularly enjoy it for the nesting opportunities it presents.
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  3. Tapping Maple Trees for Syrup

    How to Tap a Maple Tree for Syrup: Learn how to use a "Spile" to tap into your maple tree to harvest syrup from the tree and make your very own delicious home made syrup. 1.  Get a syrup spile, drill, and the correct size of drill bit. 2.  Drill at an upward angle into the tree, deep enough for the spile. 3.  Hammer in the spile and attach the bucket. 4.  Cover the bucket to protect from the elements. 5.  It is best to do this early winter when daytimes are above freezing, and nighttime is freezing.

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