Paperbark Maple Tree

The paperbark maple tree is a deciduous, slow-growing maple tree. It prefers full sun to partial shade. Paperbark maple trees grow best in moist, well-drained soil, but will survive in a variety of soil conditions, although it is not drought tolerant. Hardy in zones five through seven, the paperbark maple tree will perform better in the north than it will the south.

A paperbark maple tree will grow to a height of twenty feet and have an equal mature spread. The rounded shape of this maple tree makes it particularly stunning as a species plant. The paperbark maple tree is noted, and named, for its cinnamon colored bark, which peels off in thin, curly strips. It is also popular for its crimson red fall foliage. The trunk of a paperbark maple tree is often multi-stemmed.

A paperbark maple tree should be mulched to keep the roots cool, as well as prevent any competing plants from growing. The upright form of a paperbark maple tree often will become excessively twiggy inside. The leaves are three to six inches wide and are trifoliate. The paperbark maple tree is one of the last maple trees to develop fall color, and the leaves will persist into winter.

Paperbark maple trees have non-showy flowers that help to fertilize the trees. There are no significant cultivars of paperbark maple trees. They have a medium texture, and will live for many years. Paperbark maple trees make a perfect addition to any small garden or landscape.

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